Sunday, January 7, 2018

The Grateful Dead - Shows in California 3-12/72

1972 was a big year for the Grateful Dead. They fully integrated new members Keith and then Donna Godchaux, bid adieu to Pigpen as a performing member of the band, went on a wild jaunt in Europe in the spring, and toured steadily during the summer, fall, and winter, culminating in a quintet of December shows in Long Beach and San Francisco. I saw the Dead nine times in 1972, including the two August shows I discussed here.

The Dead began the year in a very atypical fashion, playing a show at Winterland on the evening of January 2 following their New Years show.  I did not attend that show, but did make their next gig, also at Winterland. During the first several years I saw shows at Winterland, Bill Graham and crew experimented with different positions in the hall for the stage. For New Year’s the stage was located on the narrower side of the auditorium, adjacent to Post Street, a position that became standard from December 1972 until the hall closed at the end of 1978. However, for the March 5 show (a benefit for the Native Americans who had occupied Alcatraz Island at the time), the stage was located on the long dimension of the auditorium, opposite the main entrance on Steiner Street. It remained in this location throughout most of 1972, only returning to the alternate location sometime prior to the mid-December run of Dead shows.

This show was notable for several reasons. The Sons of Champlin, still operating under the name Yogi Phlegm, were scheduled to open the show. However, guitarist Terry Haggerty, vibes player Geoff Palmer, and bassist David Shallock were seriously delayed, ostensibly caught in traffic, and Bill Graham wanted to keep the lengthy show as on schedule as possible, so the rest of the band recruited a couple of the musicians in the green room to temporarily fill out their ranks. Thus the show opened with the quartet of Bill Champlin, Bill Vitt, Phil Lesh, and Jerry Garcia jamming out on a medley of “Big Boss Man” and “How Blue Can You Get.” At the conclusion of those songs, the other two Phlegmatic musicians took the stage, and Jerry and Phil went back to whatever they were doing earlier. The Sons of Champlin/Sons/Yogi Phlegm never got their due as a sublime jamming vehicle, and it was not mere convenience that led the Dead to enlist them so frequently as an opening act.

The New Riders followed and I have no memories of anything that distinguished their set. This was a transitional period for the Riders, with bassist David Torbert emerging as a lead singer and songwriter to balance the front man duties with John ‘Marmaduke’ Dawson, who had done most of the writing and lead singing previously. Pedal steel player Buddy Cage, only a few months into his gig of replacing Garcia, had already firmly established himself as an essential part of the sound of NRPS MK II. What I do remember was that the Riders played a long set and  that, coupled with some unusually long breaks between sets, meant that the Dead took the stage very late, probably after 11. One of the most memorable aspects of the pre-Dead set break was Wavy Gravy, lying on stage in a full body cast, delivering one of his memorably free-form monologues.

The Dead’s performance that night was notable for several reasons. First and foremost, it turned out to be the band’s last hometown show with Pigpen, who had delivered some virtuoso performances during the band’s New Year’s run and remained in strong form for this show. Secondly, it represented the debut performance of Weir and Barlow’s “Black Throated Wind,” and that of the revised version of “Greatest Story Ever Told” that appeared on Weir’s solo album Ace, which had been recorded in the early months of the year. “Good Lovin’” had also been retooled, adding a high harmony part, sung by Phil Lesh, to the song’s chorus. Structurally, it was a very odd show, with a typical first set followed by a 30 minute, four-song second set (“Good Lovin,’” “Not Fade Away”>”Goin’ Down the Road Feelin’ Bad”> “Not Fade Away”). The short second set, appended by a brief “One More Saturday Night” encore, was at the behest of promoter Graham, who was running up against the venue’s 2 AM curfew. 

Grateful Dead Winterland 3/5/72
Bertha
Black Throated Wind (debut)
Mr. Charlie
Sugaree
Greatest Story Ever Told
Next Time You See Me
Tennessee Jed
Jack Straw
China Cat Sunflower> 
I Know You Rider 
Mexicali Blues
You Win Again
El Paso
Casey Jones

Good Lovin' 
Not Fade Away> 
Goin' Down The Road Feeling Bad> 
Not Fade Away

One More Saturday Night

That Winterland Benefit was also the Dead’s last hometown show until the August San Jose>Berkeley Community Theatre run (discussed here), but I had the opportunity to see them sooner than that at my first out-of-town show, 6/17/72 at the Hollywood Bowl. The Dead had played the Hollywood Bowl once previously, on a 9/15/67 bill with the Jefferson Airplane. This was not only the largest venue I had seen the Dead to date, but also my first time seeing them outdoors.  Although this was well over a year before the Wall of Sound started evolving, the audio system provided was more than adequate to provide clear sound to us in our seats, which were roughly midway back in the Bowl. Once again, the New Riders preceded the Dead with a fairly typical set for the era, closing with an extended version of “Willie and the Hand Jive.” 

The Dead’s sets represented Pigpen’s last performance onstage with the band, but he was a wraithlike presence behind his organ for the entire show. In contrast to his heroic efforts during the Europe ’72 tour, he took no vocals, and his instrumental contributions, although not insubstantial, were relatively subdued. The show featured the debut, late in the first set, of a new Hunter/Garcia song, “Stella Blue” which evolved to become one of the mainstays of the post-drums slot where Garcia often sang one of their ballads.
The second set was again relatively abbreviated at about an hour, containing a fairly typical, yet abbreviated, medley of “Truckin’”>”The Other One”> “Ramble On Rose.” The set concluded with that era’s standard closing medley of “Not Fade Away”>”Goin Down the Road Feelin’ Bad” with “One More Saturday Night” tacked on in lieu of an encore, most likely a result of the familiar tug-of-war between the Dead wanting to play long sets and venue-imposed curfews. 

Grateful Dead Hollywood Bowl 6/17/72
The Promised Land
Sugaree
Black Throated Wind
Tennessee Jed
Me And My Uncle
China Cat Sunflower > 
I Know You Rider
Playing In The Band
Loser
Beat It On Down The Line
Stella Blue (debut)
El Paso
Casey Jones

Truckin' > 
Drums > 
The Other One 
Ramble On Rose
Sugar Magnolia
Not Fade Away>
Goin' Down The Road Feeling Bad>
One More Saturday Night


In contrast to the two performances the Dead played locally during the first half of the year, they played ten hometown shows in the latter half of the year in addition to touring relentlessly elsewhere. First off, the band played a masterful run a run of local shows starting in San Jose and concluding with four at the Berkeley Community Theatre.  The two of those shows which I attended are described here. At the last of the Berkeley shows, it was announced that they would be back in town for an October 9 show at the much roomier Winterland as a benefit for the band’s road crew.  For this show, our UCSC contingent snagged prime seats in the balcony opposite the mid-arena stage that Graham used during most of 1972.  Once again, the New Riders opened the show, followed by a more typically generous two sets from the Dead. The first set was notable for the live debut of the revival of “Box Of Rain,” which was performed onstage at most a couple of times during acoustic sets around the time it was recorded for “American Beauty in 1970. The new, electric version is the arrangement that the band performed during the remainder of its touring history, at that time prominently featuring Donna Godchaux on harmony vocals.  The first set concluded with a 20 minute version of “Playing in the Band,” reminiscent of some of the more interesting versions of that tune performed during the European tour. 
Set two opened with an oddity, a brief blues jam featuring a possibly chemically altered Grace Slick riffing vocally in front of the bemused band. The second set medley consisted once more of “Truckin’” leading into “The Other One,” this time followed by “Wharf Rat.” Overall, this was an exceptionally generous and well-played show, clearly reflecting the many miles the band had logged on the road in previous weeks. 

Grateful Dead Winterland 10/9/72
The Promised Land
Deal
Me And My Uncle
Tennessee Jed
Black Throated Wind [6:48]
Friend Of The Devil
Beat It On Down The Line
Loser
El Paso
Box Of Rain (first since 10/70) 
China Cat Sunflower > 
I Know You Rider
Mexicali Blues
Sugaree
Playing In The Band

Jam with Grace Slick> 
He's Gone
Big River
Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodeloo
Greatest Story Ever Told
Brokedown Palace
Truckin' > 
The Other One> 
Wharf Rat
Sugar Magnolia
Casey Jones

Johnny B. Goode

As detailed in a nice Lost LiveDead piece, the Dead and Allman Brothers were slotted for three nights at Winterland in early December. However, the untimely death of bassist Berry Oakley in early November led to the Allmans not performing, and I believe it was close to Thanksgiving when tickets for the showsn now featuring the Dead without the Allmans, went on sale. The New Riders were touring back east, so the Dead selected three different opening acts for these shows. Incidentally, this was the first time I opted to go to a complete hometown run of shows, something to be repeated all too often in the future. Between October and December, the stage configuration at Winterland shifted once again to the stage occupying the shorter, west-facing dimension of the hall (where it remained for the remainder of the auditorium's existence), and I remember being up close on the floor for all three nights. 
Grateful Dead Winterland 12/10/72 Photo: Michael Parrish
The first show had scheduled Bay Area bluegrass band High Country as the opening act. High Country was already an institution by 1972, fronted by  mandolin player Butch Waller, a crony of Garcia’s from his bluegrass days. I’m not sure if my friends and I arrived late, or whether High Country ultimately did not make the gig, but I certainly have no memory of them performing at the show (I suspect the latter was the case). The Sons of Champlin played another reliably funky set the second night, and the 12th represented the second and final co-billing of the Dead and the Rowan Brothers. The Rowans set was notable by the presence of David Grisman (still identified from the stage as “David Diadem”) playing electric piano rather than mandolin, and by the Rowans’ clothing, which consisted of western suits outfitted with patterns of small electric lights. The Dead followed suit in debuting the set of their own country suits, without lights, crafted for them by notable Los Angeles tailor Nudie.  One other fashion note is that these were the first local shows Bob Weir played sans his signature pony tail (It appears that he probably cut his hair between the October and November tours). 
Bob Weir and Bill Kreutzmann Winterland 12/10/72
Photo: Michael Parrish

Jerry Garcia Winterland 12/10/72 Photo: Michael Parrish


The three Winterland Dead shows maintained the very high playing standards that the band exhibited throughout the year. I would be hard pressed to identify any shows from 1972 that were subpar). They were very long shows, with 14 song first sets the first two nights, but only 13 on the 12th. Box of Rain was played all three nights, as were Playing in the Band and Sugar Magnolia. The centerpieces of the second sets on the 10th and 12th were Truckin>Drums>The Other One, whereas the 11th featured a 33 minute Dark Star that led into Stella Blue. One of the reasons 1972 shows are so engaging is that the extended segments labeled as “the Other One” and “Dark Star” opened up into extremely varied and engaging group instrumental improvisations that, to my ears at least, had more substance than most of the ‘space’ segments of the band’s later years.

Winterland 12/10/72 - Sunday     
Cold Rain And Snow
Beat It On Down The Line
Don't Ease Me In
Black Throated Wind
Bird Song
El Paso
Around And Around
Tennessee Jed
Big River
Box Of Rain
Candyman
Bertha
Playing In The Band
Casey Jones

The Promised Land
Stella Blue
Jack Straw
China Cat Sunflower>
I Know You Rider
Truckin' >
Drums >
The Other One
Deal
Sugar Magnolia
Ramble On Rose
Johnny B. Goode

Uncle John's Band

Winterland 12/11/72 Monday
The Promised Land
Sugaree
Mexicali Blues
Loser
Me And Bobby McGee
Brown Eyed Women
Beat It On Down The Line
China Cat Sunflower >
I Know You Rider
Box Of Rain
He's Gone
Around And Around
Friend Of The Devil
Me And My Uncle
Big Railroad Blues
Playing In The Band

Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodeloo
Dark Star > Stella Blue
Big River
Deal
Tomorrow Is Forever
 Sugar Magnolia

Casey Jones

Winterland 12/12/72 Tuesday
Bertha
Beat It On Down The Line
Brown Eyed Women
Mexicali Blues
Bird Song
Jack Straw
Cumberland Blues
Box Of Rain
El Paso
Don't Ease Me In
Me And Bobby McGee
Tennessee Jed
Around and Around

Playing In The Band
He's Gone
Truckin' >
Nobody's Fault But Mine Jam>
Bass And Drums >
The Other One > Sing Me Back Home
Sugar Magnolia
Goin' Down The Road Feeling Bad >
One More Saturday Night

Johnny B. Goode


Following the Winterland shows, the Dead played a single southern California show on the 15th at the Long Beach Arena that I did not attend, featuring a remarkable long form second set segment that led from Truckin' through a unique uptempo improvised segment into "Dark Star" and culminating in a powerful “Morning Dew.” They then took a couple of weeks off for the holidays, returning to Winterland for the New Year’s show discussed here.

Thursday, January 4, 2018

New Year’s Eve shows with the Grateful Dead and friends Pt. 1

During their tenure as a band, the Grateful Dead worked on New Year’s Eve 22 times. I attended 17 of those shows and listened to two more remotely. What started out as a year-end celebration for most of the top-line San Francisco bands of the 1960s evolved into an annual tradition for the band and promoter Bill Graham. These marathons were hit-and-miss musically, but always were memorable spectacles that marked the transition from one year into the next in high style.

I was too young to participate in the first several NYE shows. It is conceivable that the Dead played somewhere on NYE 1965, but no information I have come across supports a gig on that date.1966, at Graham’s Fillmore Auditorium, featured the Dead, Airplane, and Quicksilver. The band was back east in late December, 1967, and played Boston’s Psychedelic Supermarket the two nights before NYE, but sat out the 31st. Back in San Francisco, Graham held a celebration at Winterland with the Airplane, Big Brother, Quicksilver, and Freedom Highway. At the end of 1968, the Dead played the first of their six New Year’s shows at Winterland, along with Quicksilver, Santana, and It’s a Beautiful Day. This show is documented at length in a wonderful Lost Live Dead essay. 1969 found the band on the road again, playing their first out-of-town New Year’s Show at the relatively tiny Boston Tea Party. A splendid soundboard recording exists of this show, and recordings of all of the band’s subsequent New Year’s shows are easily found online or as official audio and/or video releases.

My first glimpse of the Dead at New Year’s came from the 1970-71 marathon. I did not attend, but decided to experience the event in what was planned as a dazzling multi-media extravaganza, featuring a video feed courtesy of KQED and a quadrophonic audio feed involving broadcasts from two FM stations, KSAN and KQED-FM. The early parts of this show remain a mystery, as the broadcasts did not start until early in the support set from Hot Tuna. Advertised as further support were the Acoustic Dead, Stoneground, and the New Riders of the Purple Sage, but I do not know which of these bands actually played. It seems certain that the Dead did not play an acoustic set, as they had basically abandoned that format in their shows after the early November Capitol Theater run. I would imagine the New Riders and Stoneground may have played brief sets before the broadcast started. If anyone reading this attended this show and remembers who played, please chime in.  The Tuna set was beset by sound problems. At that point in time, FM simulcasts depended on dedicated telephone lines from the venue to the stations, and both KSAN and KQED started having audio difficulties at the start of the broadcast, although they were generally ironed out for the bulk of the Tuna set, which found the band playing as an electric quartet comprising guitarist Jorma Kaukonen, bassist Jack Casady, drummer Sammy Piazza and harmonica player Will Scarlet. Building on the repertoire that Jorma and Jack had introduced on the initial eponymous (and acoustic) Hot Tuna album, the group debuted new material like Kaukonen’s “Ode to Billy Dean” which memorialized one of Kaukonen’s musical comrades from his south bay folk club days, and “Third Week in the Chelsea” a plaintive tune that foreshadowed the implosion of Jorma and Jack’s other band, the Jefferson Airplane.

After a decent break, the Dead came out and embarked on one of their extended tuning sessions before plowing into a strong version of “Truckin’” one of the most popular tunes off of their recently released American Beauty. Almost immediately, things started to go south, with one and then both radio signals cutting out, although the TV signal persisted throughout the Dead’s generous set. Some onstage sound issues led the band to play a rare electric version of “Monkey and The Engineer” while the crew dealt with the technical glitches. The rest of the set was pretty pro-forma for late 1970, ending with a neat medley of “Good Lovin’” and “Uncle John’s Band.” It was a frustrating evening for me, trying to get a good sound signal on one or the other of the two FM stations, both of which bailed after the seventh song, “Dire Wolf.” I then tried to record off of the TV using some cheap condenser mics, but my brother’s tape recorder’s drive belt was failing, producing speed fluctuations that rendered the tape unlistenable. Today one can find a hybrid version of the show online, incorporating audience recordings, part of the funky FM signals, and some soundboard bits. In the early 2000s, an additional tape from that evening surfaced featuring a jam between Hot Tuna and Bob Weir that transpired in the wee hours after the Dead ended their set.

The first NYE show I attended was 12/31/71. I remember procuring hard tickets at the box office in the Sharon Heights shopping center. Tickets were $5 in advance. I went with my friend Tim P., who shared a number of Dead shows with me during our college years.  We snagged balcony seats on the east side of the ballroom, providing a clear view of the proceedings without the crowds and chaos on the floor. As was the case the previous year, the entire show was broadcast on KSAN, and my parents were kind enough to record the show during their NYE at home.

First up (and unbilled in the advance ads for the show) were the Sons of Champlin, who were still operating under the moniker Yogi Phlegm – a name they adopted for some arcane reason during most of 1971 into the early part of 1972. I should note that the Yogi Phlegm set from 3/5/72, which started with a jam between YP members Bill Champlin, Geoff Palmer, and Bill Vitt and Garcia and Lesh, often mistakenly circulates as this evening’s performance. Their actual set, with the broadcast plagued by some audio issues, consisted of the following:

Yogi Phlegm 12/31/71
Papa Can Play
Who
Whatcha Gonna Do?
All and Everything
Let Your Daddy Know
Right On
Welcome To the Dance Suite (Silence>Sound/Turn Around/Healthy Woman)
?Wasted
Without Love
Cold Sweat.

As was the case during the band’s Yogi Phlegm days, the set was very open-ended, with lots of jamming, and consisted mostly of material from their most recent and subsequent 1970s albums. 

The New Riders had toured steadily with the Dead throughout 1971, but this was their first local show with Buddy Cage rather than Garcia on pedal steel. They played a generous and energetic set, comprising most of the material from their first two albums:

New Riders of the Purple Sage 12/31/71
Six Days On The Road
I Don't Know You
Sing Me a Rainbow
Dim Lights, Thick Smoke (And Loud, Loud Music)
Sailin'
Henry
Portland Woman
Truck Drivin' Man
Garden Of Eden
Hello Mary Lou
Runnin' Back To You
I Don't Need No Doctor
Last Lonely Eagle
Louisiana Lady
Willie And The Hand Jive.

In addition to Cage replacing Garcia, the biggest change was the introduction of lead vocals by David Nelson (“Dim Lights”) and Dave Torbert (“Willie and the Hand Jive”, “I Don’t Need no Doctor”).

As Midnight approached, the anticipation mounted for the transition into 1972, and for the Dead’s performance. For what became a tradition moving forwards, Bill Graham shuffled onto the stage dressed as father time, crawling into a clock. At the witching hour, balloons dropped, fake explosions occurred, and two BGP folks in diapers emerged from the clock and started running around the stage as the Dead launched into “Dancing in the Streets,” with Weir changing the second line to “It’s New Year’s Eve so I do Believe, there’ll be dancing in the streets.” This was the only version of “Dancin’” that the Dead performed in 1971 and the last they would play until the dreaded Disco revival of the song in 1976, and it’s a good, powerful rendition, punctuated on the radio broadcast by whoops and hollers from the naked new year’s babies.  After Dancin’ Weir surveyed the damage and commented “ I hope to tell you, this stage is a fXXXing mess.” Undaunted, the band tuned up and launched into “Mr. Charlie” the first of an abundance of Pigpen tunes performed that night, including the debut of his new rocker “Chinatown Shuffle” midway through the first set. This was Pig’s first bay area appearance since his illness, and he came through in fine form, as he had during the earlier December tour. The opening set also included most of the new Hunter-Garcia tunes unveiled that year, along with Weir’s newish “Playing in the Band” and the set-closing “One More Saturday Night,” which featured the debut of Donna Godchaux’s signature wails with the band.

The second set featured the pairing of “Truckin’” and “The Other One” (here a sandwich enclosing “Me and My Uncle)” that was by far the most-played of the band’s long-form excursions that year. Late in the second set, well into the wee hours of the morning, Weir and Garcia traded verses on the first live version of “Big River”  Pig delivered another rarity, an eerie version of “The Same Thing,” which was the only version of that tune sung by him since 1967 and featured some outstanding slide guitar from Garcia. After closing the second set with a strong version of Not Fade Away>Goin’ Down the Road>Not Fade Away medley that closed most of their shows in 1971 and on into 1972, the band encored with a fun but sloppy version of “Casey Jones.”

Grateful Dead 12/31/71
Dancing In The Streets
Mr. Charlie
Brown Eyed Women
Beat It On Down The Line
You Win Again
Jack Straw
Sugaree 
El Paso
Chinatown Shuffle
Tennessee Jed
Mexicali Blues
China Cat Sunflower
I Know You Rider
Next Time You See Me
Playing In The Band
Loser 
One More Saturday Night*

Trucking'> 
Drums>
The Other One > 
Me And My Uncle> 
The Other One > Black Peter
Big River
The Same Thing
Ramble On Rose
Sugar Magnolia
Not Fade Away> 
Goin' Down The Road Feeling Bad>
Not Fade Away

Casey Jones
* Donna Jean Godchaux's onstage debut with the Dead

The next year, New Year’s tickets went on sale around Thanksgiving (before those for the December 10-12 Winterland run) and they were still relatively easy to procure. I drove up to Winterland with a few friends from high school and college, and we settled into the balcony about mid-hall on stage left for what we knew would be a long evening.

For 1972, the New Year’s lineup was identical to that in 1971, with the minor exception that Yogi Phlegm had wisely reverted to calling themselves the Sons of Champlin in early 1972.  Their short set consisted mostly of material from their Welcome to the Dance album, which came out the following year. I’m not sure why their set was so short, but it did pave the way for the very long set from the New Riders that followed.

Sons 12/31/72:
The Swim
Welcome To The Dance suite(Silence>Sound/Turn Around/Healthy Woman)
For Joy
Lightnin’
Without Love

By the end of 1972, the New Riders of the Purple Sage were a mature, confident headlining act with three Columbia albums under their belt, and had fully integrated material sung by both David Nelson and Dave Torbert. They played an expansive set, nearly two hours in length, including originals from all three albums along with extended versions of “I Don’t Need A Doctor” and “Willie and the Hand Jive” among the several covers. Harmonica player Matthew Kelly (who had played with Torbert in a band called Horses before he joined the New Riders and would co-found a new band, Kingfish, with him in 1974) guested on harmonica on several tunes.

New Riders 12/31/72
I Don't Know You
Lochnivar
Hello Mary Lou
Henry
California Day
She's No Angel
Superman
Whiskey
Groupie*
Portland Woman
Rainbow
Truck Drivin' Man
All I Ever Wanted
 I Don't Need No Doctor*
Long Black Veil
Louisiana Lady
School Days
Dim Lights, Thick Smoke (And Loud, Loud Music)
 Take A Letter Maria
Last Lonely Eagle
Willie & The Hand Jive*
Encore: Glendale Train
(*w/ Matthew Kelly on Harmonica)

As midnight approached, the Grateful Dead took the stage resplendent in the Nudie tailored suits they first wore at their previous Bay Area gig, also at Winterland, on 12/12/72. Following a more conventional year-end countdown than that of the previous year, the Dead launched into Chuck Berry’s Around and Around, which they had started playing sporadically in late 1970 and moved into a more regular rotation in the fall of 1972. Highlights of the first set included an early “Box of Rain” and “Don’t Ease Me In,” the jug band tune that was the band’s first single and that similarly had been added to regular rotation in the fall.  Following a long, exploratory “Playing in the Band,” the Dead wrapped up the first set with “Casey Jones.”

The second set opened with another Chuck Berry tune, “Promised Land, followed by an early version of “Half Step Mississippi Uptown Toodeloo,” the first of a new batch of songs they were prepping for their next studio album, Wake of The Flood. The high point of the second set was the extended version of “The Other One, which lasted a good 40 minutes including a drums and bass interlude, and was augmented by David Crosby joining in midway on electric 12 string. As was fairly typical in that era, the structure of “The Other One” was completely abandoned for a long interval following the drums, but eventually returned to familiar territory, leading into a gorgeous version of “Morning Dew” with Crosby still on board. After pausing to tune up, the set continued with “Sugar Magnolia”, dedicated to Bill Graham, and a soulful “Sing Me Back Home.” Near the end of that song, dust and detritus started raining down on the stage, and it slowly became apparent that an adventurous soul had somehow climbed through an opening in the roof of Winterland to land on the extremely fragile looking lighting rig. The band hastily exited the stage, while Bill Graham coached the fellow to hang on while a rope was lowered allowing him to climb down to safety without injuring himself or anyone on stage. Graham’s handling of this potentially deadly situation was masterful. However, the momentum of the Dead’s performance had been disrupted by the human drama, and they wound up the main set with their third Berry tune of the evening, “Johnny B. Goode,” returning for two encores: Uncle John’s Band and “One More Saturday Night.
Sometime before or during the second set, an announcement was made that a jam session would follow the Dead’s set, including Joni Mitchell and others. As a result, my friends and I stuck around for a good half hour after the Dead’s set concluded, but no more music transpired, at least onstage. This was to be the last Grateful Dead New Year’s performance until 1976, which is where I will pick this up in a subsequent post.
  
Grateful Dead 12/31/72 (well, really 1/1/73):
Around & Around
Deal
Mexicali Blues
Brown Eyed Women
Box Of Rain
Jack Straw
Don't Ease Me In
Beat It On Down The Line
Candyman
El Paso
Tennessee Jed
Playin' In The Band
Casey Jones

Promised Land
Mississippi Half Step
Big River
Sugaree
Truckin'>
The Other One>
Drums>
The Other One*>
Morning Dew*
Sugar Magnolia
Sing Me Back Home
(guy on light rig drama)
Johnny B. Goode
E: Uncle John's Band

E: One More Saturday Night